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Professional Development Opportunity! Training Weekend.

 Hello and welcome everyone to what would normally be another article in my nutrition series! Today I’m starting my monthly three day training program, so there won’t be any nutrition article today.

In case you missed my first post on the topic, I’ve been awarded an opportunity through the studio I work at to take a professional Pilates instructor course! I am thrilled and feel so blessed to be given this amazing experience to progress my professional career as a trainer. This scholarship is only presented once a year to employees who show merit and a passion for fitness, so it was a dream come true to be given such a rare gift. It’s an amazing feeling, and one I am currently finding hard to put into words.

The only downside to this program is that one Friday a month I won’t be able to post my normal nutrition blog because I’ll be away from the internet and in training.

Not to worry, the rest of the month will remain unscathed, and you can expect blog entries on the regularly scheduled time and format.

Thank you for your patience with this wonderful growth opportunity I’ve been blessed with, and I look forward to posting another entry next week as life returns to normal.

Cheers,

Fey

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Cooking Shows

Cran-tastic Cranberries For Your Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! In anticipation of the Thanksgiving holiday next week I thought we could talk about an iconic fall treat, cranberries!

Cran-tastic cranberries have health benefits to add to your diet such as: helping heal UTIs, protecting our heart and warding off dental concerns. These health benefits are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

Cranberries are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Vitamin E
  • Manganese
  • Copper
  • Antioxidant Polyphoenols like Proanthocyandin

As you may know, cranberries are a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables and foods high in Vitamin C, like cranberries, had the largest positive impact.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

Think of manganese as a superhero for our bones. This mineral helps bones grow and then maintain their density. Manganese, when combined with calcium, zinc and copper, supports bone mineral density in any age of human development. However, this is very important in our active ageing populations. As you may have heard, when we age our bones begin to lose their density. This can cause bones to become weak and break easily, so manganese is important to make sure we are ingesting enough of as we get older.

Copper is a very vital mineral that every part of the body needs in order to function. Why, you might ask? Because copper helps our bodies make red blood cells, keep our nerve cells healthy and support our immune system. Copper also helps our body form collagen, absorb iron from the food we eat and assists in energy production. That sounds like a super important mineral to me!

Additionally, cranberries contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Proanthocyandin is a type of polyphenol found in cranberries. And here’s a quick rundown on polyphenols. Polyphenols are a type of micronutrient humans can ingest by eating specific plant-based foods. These micronutrients are packed with antioxidants and health benefits. So, jumping back to proantocyandin, researchers at the Center for Oral Biology and Eastman Department of Dentistry from the University of Rochester Medical Center found that this polyphenol from cranberries was able to prevent oral bacteria from sticking to our teeth. Which is great news for dentists, as the less bacteria that attaches to our teeth the healthier they are and the less chances there are of our teeth developing dental problems down the road. Think of proanthocyandian as Teflon for our teeth. The polyphenol creates a barrier bacteria can’t stick to and cause harm to our teeth!

Proanthocyandin is also somewhat of a superhero in the circles of UTI patients. UTI stands for Urinary Tract Infection, and if you’ve ever had one of these awful infections then you know how much of a lifesaver cranberries can be. In the same way proanthocyandin prevents bacteria from sticking to our teeth, this same polyphenol prevents the UTI bacteria from attaching themselves to the urinary tract walls, which can prevent the spread of the infection and decrease the time you have one. This treatment has actually been around for hundreds of years, as Native Americans used cranberries as a treatment for bladder and kidney diseases.

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No Nutrition Blog Post Today: Fey is Sick!

Hello and welcome everyone to my nutrition series. Unfortunately, I am very ill and don’t have enough coherent thought to make a blog post today detailing the nutrient profile and recipes for anything.

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My NyQuil fueled mind is having enough trouble getting out of bed to make this entry, so I’m sorry to disappoint anyone. But not to worry, next week I will be back on track with another entry in this series for you.

Until then, have a wonderful weekend!

Cheers,

Fey

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FeyFitness

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fey_fitness

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FeyFitness

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Cooking Shows

Pomegranates for Taste and Good Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! It’s suddenly cold and rainy here on this suspiciously wintery feeling Friday and today we are going to talk about one of my guilty pleasures- the pretty pomegranate.

Pomegranates are a complicated fruit to eat. Technically they are a berry, but the exterior skin is thick and inedible, trust me on this. But what is edible are the amazingly delicious seeds inside, which are called arils. Fantastic pomegranates have health benefits to add to your diet such as: reducing free radicals in the body, protecting our heart and aiding our bodies with their anti-inflammatory properties. These health benefits are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

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Pomegranates are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Folate
  • Potassium
  • Antioxidant Punicalagin
  • Punicic Acid

As you may know, pomegranates are a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables and foods high in Vitamin C, like pomegranates, had the largest positive impact.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

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While folate, which is one of the B-vitamins, is important for tissue growth and normal cell function. Further, folate is especially important for pregnant women and our active aging populations.

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that pomegranates can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively. This is great for those of us wanting to lead more physically active lifestyles as the potassium found in pomegranates can make our muscles more effective during exercise or sports!

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Additionally, pomegranates contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. Pomegranates contain three times (3x) the antioxidant levels of green tea or red wines. Which is quite the feat for such little arils!

These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Punicalagins are a type of antioxidant found in pomegranate juice. This particular type of antioxidant works to reduce inflammation in the body. Preliminary studies are showing that pomegranates can reduce inflammation in the digestive tract, as well as work wonders for decreasing the inflammation in breast cancer and colon cancer cells. Diabetics can also rejoice for the health benefits of punicalagins. In a study performed by scientists Sohrab, Nasrollahzadeh, Zand, Amiri, Tohidi and Kimiagar during a 12-week study concerning people with diabetes, the researchers found that 1.1 cups (250 ml) of pomegranate juice per day lowered the inflammation markers CRP and interleukin-6 by 32% and 30%, respectively. Which may sound a little too “sciency” for this nutrition series, so just know that this is a really good thing for anyone living with diabetes.

Punicic Acid is a type of fatty acid found in the arils, or seeds, of pomegranates. Punicic Acid is a type of Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) that many people use to help reduce their overall body fat percentage. I know many a personal trainer, nutritionist and doctor who tell their clients or patients about how wonderful CLA’s are for fat reduction. Science is also starting to point out that CLA consumption has a link to lower risks of developing type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

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Professional Development Opportunity!

Hello and welcome everyone to what would normally be another article in my nutrition series! Today I’ve got some good news, and some bad news.

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So let’s start with the good news. I’ve been awarded an opportunity through the studio I work at to take a professional Pilates instructor course! I am thrilled and feel so blessed to be given this amazing experience to progress my professional career as a trainer. This scholarship is only presented once a year to employees who show merit and a passion for fitness, so it was a dream come true to be given such a rare gift. It’s an amazing feeling, and one I am currently finding hard to put into words.

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However, here also comes the bad news. The program is very rigorous and involves some travel. The location for the training has no internet and is held once a month over a three to four day weekend. This means that I won’t be able to publish a nutrition blog one Friday a month for the next few months until I am finished with the program.

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Not to worry, the rest of the month will remain unscathed, and you can expect blog entries on the regularly scheduled time and format.

Thank you for your patience with this wonderful growth opportunity I’ve been blessed with, and I look forward to posting another entry next week as life returns to normal.

Cheers,

Fey

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Cooking Shows

Wrinkly Prunes for Heart and Bone Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! Friday is again upon us and we are going to explore what happens to a plum when it is dehydrated and becomes a PRUNE.

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Prunes are a dried out plum, which are members of the Prunus genus and are related to other delicious foods like peaches, nectarines and oddly enough, almonds. Wrinkly prunes have health benefits to add to your diet such as: reducing free radicals in the body, keeping our red blood cells healthy and protecting our heart. These elements are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

Prunes are also an excellent source of:

  • Soluble and Insoluble Fiber
  • Iron
  • Boron
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin K
  • Potassium
  • Antioxidants

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Now, you may be thinking, “what’s with all this fancy fiber?” But worry not, I am about to explain what on earth these different types of fiber are, and why you should care.

Soluble Fiber is like the police force of the body. This type of fiber attaches itself to cholesterol particles in the body and helps them to be removed when we visit the restroom. This is very important because it helps to reduce the body’s overall cholesterol levels, which can be a contributing factor to heart disease.

Insoluble fiber can be thought of like a massive sponge in the large intestines. This type of fiber draws in water and helps regulate the movement of food through our intestines. So if you are having problems going to the restroom, then the insoluble fiber in prunes can help.

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Prunes also contain minerals like iron. Iron is a vital part of hemoglobin, which is the stuff found in red blood cells that is responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. This means that if your body doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells, your body isn’t getting enough oxygen. A lack of oxygen in the body can make you feel fatigued, like your brain is in a “fog” or decrease your immune system.

Another mineral in prunes that you may not have heard of is boron. Boron helps activate fibroblasts of the skin after an injury to speed up the healing process. This mineral also spurs bone and tissue repair throughout the body, and dentists love boron because it helps keep our teeth and gum tissue healthy. Boron is also useful for reducing inflammation, which is great if you aren’t an avid flosser in between dental visits.

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

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Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that prunes can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively.

As you may know, prunes contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes.

These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Polyphenol antioxidants found in prunes have a fantastic impact on bone maintenance reduce the chances of developing heart diseases or diabetes. The reason for this is because polyphenols are powerful anti-inflammatories that can help those who suffer from joint inflammation or lung problems. Prunes contain over twice the polyphenol content of peaches or nectarines, so they are a great option for individuals struggling with inflammation problems.

Prunes have been found to contain adiponectin, a hormone responsible for blood pressure regulation. Researchers Parvin Mirmiran, Zahra Bahadoran and Fereidoun Azizi conducted a study on functional foods in the diet and their impact on managing type two (2) diabetes. The researchers uncovered that prunes, and other such foods, can have a positive impact for diabetics by the food’s antioxidant and bioactive compounds helping the body to manage these complicated conditions.

In addition to helping regulate blood pressure, prunes also help us protect our heart. Heart health is a serious matter, and as someone with a heart condition I can attest to how awful it is to have problems with one of our most vital organs. Prunes and their juice has been proven to lower blood pressure, overall total cholesterol levels and the bad LDL cholesterol that we all need to avoid. The fiber, potassium and antioxidants found in prunes are being shown to have positive impacts on the risk of developing heart disease later in life.

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Cooking Shows

Pretty Plums for Exceptional Health!

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Hello and welcome to today’s installment of Cooking with Fey! Since today is Friday, we are going to explore a stone fruit that goes well in recipes or eaten fresh off the tree, the PLUM.

Plums are members of the Prunus genus and are related to other delicious foods like peaches, nectarines and oddly enough, almonds. Pretty plums have health benefits to add to your diet such as: reducing free radicals in the body, regulating our blood sugar and protecting our heart. These elements are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

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Plums are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Potassium
  • Copper
  • Manganese

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

Vitamin C is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then plums might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a paper cut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that plums can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively.

Copper is a very vital mineral that every part of the body needs in order to function. Why, you might ask? Because copper helps our bodies make red blood cells, keep our nerve cells healthy and support our immune system. Copper also helps our body form collagen, absorb iron from the food we eat and assists in energy production. That sounds like a super important mineral to me!

Think of manganese as a superhero for our bones. This mineral helps bones grow and then maintain their density. Manganese, when combined with calcium, zinc and copper, supports bone mineral density in any age of human development. However, this is very important in our active ageing populations. As you may have heard, when we age our bones begin to lose their density. This can cause bones to become weak and break easily, so manganese is important to make sure we are ingesting enough of as we get older.

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As you may know, plums contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Polyphenol antioxidants found in plums have a fantastic impact on bone maintenance reduce the chances of developing heart diseases or diabetes. The reason for this is because polyphenols are powerful anti-inflammatories that can help those who suffer from joint inflammation or lung problems. Plums contain over twice the polyphenol content of peaches or nectarines, so they are a great option for individuals struggling with inflammation problems.

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Plums have been found to contain adiponectin, a hormone responsible for blood pressure regulation. Researchers Parvin Mirmiran, Zahra Bahadoran and Fereidoun Azizi conducted a study on functional foods in the diet and their impact on managing type two (2) diabetes. The researchers uncovered that plums, and other such foods, can have a positive impact for diabetics by the food’s antioxidant and bio-active compounds helping the body to manage these complicated conditions.

In addition to helping regulate blood pressure, plums also help us protect our heart. Heart health is a serious matter, and as someone with a heart condition I can attest to how awful it is to have problems with one of our most vital organs. Plums and their juice has been proven to lower blood pressure, overall total cholesterol levels and the bad LDL cholesterol that we all need to avoid. The fiber, potassium and antioxidants found in plums are being shown to have positive impacts on the risk of developing heart disease later in life.

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Additional Reading:

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