Cooking Shows

Leafy Recipes Series: Mysterious Mustard Greens for Better Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! After surviving yet another round of snow in my area, I’m officially dreaming of warmer days and some summer sun. To help ease my imagination into warmer daydreams, let’s explore the mysterious leafy green called Mustard Greens.

But I realize that you might be asking yourself, “What on earth are mustard greens?” This leafy green is a part of the mustard plant that is used commonly in Japanese and Indian cooking. Mustard greens are a part of the cruciferous family (think kale, Brussel sprouts and cabbage). Foods from the cruciferous family are amazing for digestive health and pack a punch in terms of other health benefits. Mustard greens are no different, this yummy vegetable has many health benefits to add to your diet such as: lowering cholesterol, cancer prevention, heart health, digestive tract health and they have anti-inflammatory properties.

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Mustard greens also contains these helpful nutrients:

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Vitamin E
  • Folate
  • Potassium
  • Calcium
  • Manganese
  • Copper
  • Dietary fiber

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

As you may know, mustard greens is a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Which is especially important now that cold weather seems to be here to stay for most parts of America.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables, and foods high in Vitamin C, had the largest positive impact.

Other studies have found that activities such as daily walking, combined with mustard greens intake, can reduce blood pressure. So if you are concerned about your heart health talk to your doctor about adding mustard greens to your healthy lifestyle diet.

Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then mustard greens might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

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Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

Vitamin E is important to protecting the bodies’ vision, reproductive organs, blood, brain and skin. Gosh, that’s quite the list of benefits from one little nutrient! Vitamin E is also a source of antioxidants. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Science is also starting to show that diets rich in antioxidants have a positive effect on cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s diseases. While these illnesses currently have no known cure, diets rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds can lower the risk of developing these diseases later in life.

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Folate, which is one of the B vitamins, is important for tissue growth and normal cell function. Further, folate is especially important for pregnant women and our active aging populations.

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that mustard greens can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively. This is important for weightlifters such as myself, as it maximizes all that hard work we put in at the gym each week.

Calcium is the essential mineral everyone was taught as a kid would help us build strong bones. And you are right in remembering that from 3rd grade science. Calcium is vital for the health of our bones, and for slowing down bone density loss as we age. The mineral calcium also impacts the muscle that surrounds blood vessels, causing it to relax. Which is important for blood pressure and muscle contraction. Just remember, it is difficult for the body to effective absorb calcium without the presence of Vitamin D in the body, so be sure to have an adequate source of Vitamin D in your diet to maximize the effects of calcium.

Think of manganese as a superhero for our bones. This mineral helps bones grow and then maintain their density. Manganese, when combined with calcium, zinc and copper, supports bone mineral density in any age of human development. However, this is very important in our active ageing populations. As you may have heard, when we age our bones begin to lose their density. This can cause bones to become weak and break easily, so manganese is important to make sure we are ingesting enough of as we get older.

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Copper is a very vital mineral that every part of the body needs in order to function. Why, you might ask? Because copper helps our bodies make red blood cells, keep our nerve cells healthy and support our immune system. Copper also helps our body form collagen, absorb iron from the food we eat and assists in energy production. That sounds like a super important mineral to me!

Now, you may be thinking, “why on earth do I care about fiber?” But worry not, I am about to explain about the different types of fiber, and why you should care.

Soluble Fiber is like the police force of the body. This type of fiber attaches itself to cholesterol particles in the body and helps them to be removed when we visit the restroom. This is very important because it helps to reduce the body’s overall cholesterol levels, which can be a contributing factor to heart disease.

Insoluble fiber can be thought of like a massive sponge in the large intestines. This type of fiber draws in water and helps regulate the movement of food through our intestines. So if you are having problems going to the restroom, then the insoluble fiber in prunes can help.

 

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Cooking Shows

Leafy Recipes Series: Southern Collard Greens for Better Health!

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Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! I’m officially asking for a refund on this year’s winter. It’s been too cold and we’ve had too much snow where I live. In short, I’m over the chilly weather. So to warm myself up I’m thinking back to my childhood in the south where my grandmother would make us collard greens as a side dish with dinner during the warm weather months when it was fresh from the garden.

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But I realize that you might be asking yourself, “What on earth are collard greens?” This leafy green is a southern comfort food and staple in many dinners. Collard greens are a part of the cruciferous family (think kale, Brussel sprouts and cabbage). Foods from the cruciferous family are amazing for digestive health and pack a punch in terms of other health benefits. Collard greens are no different, this yummy vegetable has many health benefits to add to your diet such as: lowering cholesterol, cancer prevention, heart health, digestive tract health and they have anti-inflammatory properties.

Collard greens also contains these helpful nutrients:

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Vitamin E
  • Folate
  • Calcium
  • Dietary fiber

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Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

As you may know, collard greens is a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Which is especially important now that cold weather seems to be here to stay for most parts of America.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables, and foods high in Vitamin C, had the largest positive impact.

Other studies have found that activities such as daily walking, combined with collard greens intake, can reduce blood pressure. So if you are concerned about your heart health talk to your doctor about adding collard greens to your healthy lifestyle diet.

Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then collard greens might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

Vitamin E is important to protecting the bodies’ vision, reproductive organs, blood, brain and skin. Gosh, that’s quite the list of benefits from one little nutrient! Vitamin E is also a source of antioxidants. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Science is also starting to show that diets rich in antioxidants have a positive effect on cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s diseases. While these illnesses currently have no known cure, diets rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds can lower the risk of developing these diseases later in life.

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Folate, which is one of the B vitamins, is important for tissue growth and normal cell function. Further, folate is especially important for pregnant women and our active aging populations.

Calcium is the essential mineral everyone was taught as a kid would help us build strong bones. And you are right in remembering that from 3rd grade science. Calcium is vital for the health of our bones, and for slowing down bone density loss as we age. The mineral calcium also impacts the muscle that surrounds blood vessels, causing it to relax. Which is important for blood pressure and muscle contraction. Just remember, it is difficult for the body to effective absorb calcium without the presence of Vitamin D in the body, so be sure to have an adequate source of Vitamin D in your diet to maximize the effects of calcium.

Now, you may be thinking, “why on earth do I care about fiber?” But worry not, I am about to explain about the different types of fiber, and why you should care.

Soluble Fiber is like the police force of the body. This type of fiber attaches itself to cholesterol particles in the body and helps them to be removed when we visit the restroom. This is very important because it helps to reduce the body’s overall cholesterol levels, which can be a contributing factor to heart disease.

Insoluble fiber can be thought of like a massive sponge in the large intestines. This type of fiber draws in water and helps regulate the movement of food through our intestines. So if you are having problems going to the restroom, then the insoluble fiber in prunes can help.

RECIPES:

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Cooking Shows

Leafy Recipes Series: Amazing Arugula for Better Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! After two snow storms in less than a week, I’m officially ready for warm weather and spring! So today let’s continue our Leafy Recipe Series by talking about the leafy green, arugula.

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Arugula is another powerhouse vegetable that is amazing for you. Arugula has many health benefits to add to your diet such as: assisting in immune system function, protecting our heart and decreasing the impact diabetes has on the body.

Arugula also contains these helpful nutrients:

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Folate
  • Calcium
  • Antioxidant Alpha-Lipoic Acid

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Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

As you may know, arugula is a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Which is especially important now that cold weather seems to be here to stay for most parts of America.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables, and foods high in Vitamin C, had the largest positive impact.

Other studies have found that activities such as daily walking, combined with arugula intake, can reduce blood pressure. So if you are concerned about your heart health talk to your doctor about adding arugula to your healthy lifestyle diet.

Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then arugula might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

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Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

Calcium is the essential mineral everyone was taught as a kid would help us build strong bones. And you are right in remembering that from 3rd grade science. Calcium is vital for the health of our bones, and for slowing down bone density loss as we age. The mineral calcium also impacts the muscle that surrounds blood vessels, causing it to relax. Which is important for blood pressure and muscle contraction. Just remember, it is difficult for the body to effective absorb calcium without the presence of Vitamin D in the body, so be sure to have an adequate source of Vitamin D in your diet to maximize the effects of calcium.

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And you may not know that arugula contains a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Science is also starting to show that diets rich in antioxidants have a positive effect on cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s diseases. While these illnesses currently have no known cure, diets rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds can lower the risk of developing these diseases later in life.

However, arugula contains a special antioxidant called Alpha-lipoic acid that is perfect for lowering blood glucose levels, increasing insulin sensitively and prevents changes from oxidative stress that are all common in people living with diabetes. Science on this antioxidant is showing that consuming arugula also decreases nerve damage associated with having diabetes, which is great news for individuals wanting to avoid the long term peripheral and autonomic nerve damage that often results from this disease.

 

RECIPES:

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Cheers,

Fey

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FeyFitness

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fey_fitness

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FeyFitness

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Cooking Shows

Pomegranates for Taste and Good Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! It’s suddenly cold and rainy here on this suspiciously wintery feeling Friday and today we are going to talk about one of my guilty pleasures- the pretty pomegranate.

Pomegranates are a complicated fruit to eat. Technically they are a berry, but the exterior skin is thick and inedible, trust me on this. But what is edible are the amazingly delicious seeds inside, which are called arils. Fantastic pomegranates have health benefits to add to your diet such as: reducing free radicals in the body, protecting our heart and aiding our bodies with their anti-inflammatory properties. These health benefits are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

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Pomegranates are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Folate
  • Potassium
  • Antioxidant Punicalagin
  • Punicic Acid

As you may know, pomegranates are a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables and foods high in Vitamin C, like pomegranates, had the largest positive impact.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

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While folate, which is one of the B-vitamins, is important for tissue growth and normal cell function. Further, folate is especially important for pregnant women and our active aging populations.

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that pomegranates can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively. This is great for those of us wanting to lead more physically active lifestyles as the potassium found in pomegranates can make our muscles more effective during exercise or sports!

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Additionally, pomegranates contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. Pomegranates contain three times (3x) the antioxidant levels of green tea or red wines. Which is quite the feat for such little arils!

These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Punicalagins are a type of antioxidant found in pomegranate juice. This particular type of antioxidant works to reduce inflammation in the body. Preliminary studies are showing that pomegranates can reduce inflammation in the digestive tract, as well as work wonders for decreasing the inflammation in breast cancer and colon cancer cells. Diabetics can also rejoice for the health benefits of punicalagins. In a study performed by scientists Sohrab, Nasrollahzadeh, Zand, Amiri, Tohidi and Kimiagar during a 12-week study concerning people with diabetes, the researchers found that 1.1 cups (250 ml) of pomegranate juice per day lowered the inflammation markers CRP and interleukin-6 by 32% and 30%, respectively. Which may sound a little too “sciency” for this nutrition series, so just know that this is a really good thing for anyone living with diabetes.

Punicic Acid is a type of fatty acid found in the arils, or seeds, of pomegranates. Punicic Acid is a type of Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) that many people use to help reduce their overall body fat percentage. I know many a personal trainer, nutritionist and doctor who tell their clients or patients about how wonderful CLA’s are for fat reduction. Science is also starting to point out that CLA consumption has a link to lower risks of developing type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

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Cooking Shows

Pretty Plums for Exceptional Health!

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Hello and welcome to today’s installment of Cooking with Fey! Since today is Friday, we are going to explore a stone fruit that goes well in recipes or eaten fresh off the tree, the PLUM.

Plums are members of the Prunus genus and are related to other delicious foods like peaches, nectarines and oddly enough, almonds. Pretty plums have health benefits to add to your diet such as: reducing free radicals in the body, regulating our blood sugar and protecting our heart. These elements are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

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Plums are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Potassium
  • Copper
  • Manganese

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

Vitamin C is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then plums might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a paper cut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that plums can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively.

Copper is a very vital mineral that every part of the body needs in order to function. Why, you might ask? Because copper helps our bodies make red blood cells, keep our nerve cells healthy and support our immune system. Copper also helps our body form collagen, absorb iron from the food we eat and assists in energy production. That sounds like a super important mineral to me!

Think of manganese as a superhero for our bones. This mineral helps bones grow and then maintain their density. Manganese, when combined with calcium, zinc and copper, supports bone mineral density in any age of human development. However, this is very important in our active ageing populations. As you may have heard, when we age our bones begin to lose their density. This can cause bones to become weak and break easily, so manganese is important to make sure we are ingesting enough of as we get older.

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As you may know, plums contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Polyphenol antioxidants found in plums have a fantastic impact on bone maintenance reduce the chances of developing heart diseases or diabetes. The reason for this is because polyphenols are powerful anti-inflammatories that can help those who suffer from joint inflammation or lung problems. Plums contain over twice the polyphenol content of peaches or nectarines, so they are a great option for individuals struggling with inflammation problems.

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Plums have been found to contain adiponectin, a hormone responsible for blood pressure regulation. Researchers Parvin Mirmiran, Zahra Bahadoran and Fereidoun Azizi conducted a study on functional foods in the diet and their impact on managing type two (2) diabetes. The researchers uncovered that plums, and other such foods, can have a positive impact for diabetics by the food’s antioxidant and bio-active compounds helping the body to manage these complicated conditions.

In addition to helping regulate blood pressure, plums also help us protect our heart. Heart health is a serious matter, and as someone with a heart condition I can attest to how awful it is to have problems with one of our most vital organs. Plums and their juice has been proven to lower blood pressure, overall total cholesterol levels and the bad LDL cholesterol that we all need to avoid. The fiber, potassium and antioxidants found in plums are being shown to have positive impacts on the risk of developing heart disease later in life.

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Additional Reading:

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Cooking Shows

Vegan and Gluten Free 5 Ingredient Protein Breakfast Balls

Hello and welcome everyone to another episode of Cooking with Fey!

Today I will show you how to make some delicious and easy high protein breakfast balls. This tasty breakfast is high in both protein and healthy fats, while being vegan and gluten free. Foods such as this are great for those of us with heart conditions, and this recipe is low enough in sugar for diabetics to enjoy.

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Those of us with heart conditions can benefit from the healthy fats in this recipe because these fats may help lower our blood cholesterol. Having high cholesterol is bad for many reasons, but one of the main ones is that high cholesterol can cause a buildup of plaque in your arteries- which could lead to nasty conditions like heart attacks or stroke. To prevent this, make sure your diet is full of monounsaturated fats instead of the harmful saturated and trans fats. Remember it this way, fats from plants or nuts are generally good for you, while fats from animals or chemically processed things from a lab are worse for your heart.

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Protein is great to help muscles (like your heart) heal and repair. So be sure you are getting enough of this vital macro-nutrient in your diet. If you have questions about how much protein you should be eating in a day, just message me and I would be more than happy to help.

Additionally, this recipe is low enough in sugar to be a good choice for diabetics as well.

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To make this recipe yourself at home, you will need the following ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup vegan protein powder
  • 1/2 cup nut butter
  • 2 Tbsp honey (or maple syrup or agave)
  • 2 Tbsp flaked or shredded coconut (feel free to toast the coconut if you’d like)
  • 2 Tbsp Hemp hearts or diced nuts

If you’d like to make this recipe into balls like I did, simply mix these ingredients together and shape the mixture into balls with your hands. These yummy treats will keep in an air tight container in the refrigerator all week for a delicious breakfast on the go.

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As always, please like and subscribe to this channel to stay up to date on new content, and head on over to Instagram (@fey_fitness) to give me a follow or to YouTube at Fey Fitness.

My Patreon page is now live, so please go show some love there as well. I’d like to make some upgrades to my videos to enhance your viewing pleasure, and any support would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers,

Fey

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FeyFitness

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fey_fitness

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FeyFitness

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