Cooking Shows

Munch on Mangoes for Great Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! As the year winds down in the pleasant time between Christmas and New Year’s, I thought we could talk about a delightful treat- Mangoes!

Slide2

Mangoes are a tropical fruit with a creamy juicy pulp and large oval-shaped seed in the center. Many people comment that a mango tastes like a cross between a peach and a pineapple, and you get the best of both worlds on this one in terms of taste! But besides being a great addition to recipes, or eaten raw, mangoes also have health benefits to add to your diet such as: assisting in immune system function, protecting our heart and improving cognitive function.

mango-1218129__340.png

Mangoes also contain these helpful nutrients:

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Fiber
  • Folate
  • Potassium
  • Copper
  • Antioxidants

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

As you may know, mangoes are a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Which is especially important now that cold weather seems to be here to stay for most parts of America.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables and foods high in Vitamin C, like mangoes, had the largest positive impact.

Other studies have found that activities such as daily walking, combined with mango intake, can reduce blood pressure. So if you are concerned about your heart health talk to your doctor about adding mangoes to your diet.

Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then mangoes might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

red-snapper-and-shrimp-ceviche-with-avocado.jpg

Now, you may be thinking, “why on earth do I care about fiber?” But worry not, I am about to explain about the different types of fiber, and why you should care.

Soluble Fiber is like the police force of the body. This type of fiber attaches itself to cholesterol particles in the body and helps them to be removed when we visit the restroom. This is very important because it helps to reduce the body’s overall cholesterol levels, which can be a contributing factor to heart disease.

Insoluble fiber can be thought of like a massive sponge in the large intestines. This type of fiber draws in water and helps regulate the movement of food through our intestines. So if you are having problems going to the restroom, then the insoluble fiber in prunes can help.

Folate, which is one of the B vitamins, is important for tissue growth and normal cell function. Further, folate is especially important for pregnant women and our active aging populations.

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that mangoes can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively. This is important for weightlifters such as myself, as it maximizes all that hard work we put in at the gym each week.

The potassium and vitamin C in mangoes also combine to protect our heart. Heart health is important for me since I live with Atrial Fibrillation. So when I read studies like the one from Vanderbilt Medical School stating that a daily intake of potassium can lower the risk of developing heart disease, I definitely made sure to start eating mangoes so my own heart condition doesn’t worsen.

mango-1239347__340.jpg

Copper is a very vital mineral that every part of the body needs in order to function. Why, you might ask? Because copper helps our bodies make red blood cells, keep our nerve cells healthy and support our immune system. Copper also helps our body form collagen, absorb iron from the food we eat and assists in energy production. That sounds like a super important mineral to me!

As you may know, mangoes contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Science is also starting to show that diets rich in antioxidants have a positive effect on cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s diseases. While these illnesses currently have no known cure, diets rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds can lower the risk of developing these diseases later in life.

mango-1218147__340.png

RECIPES:

Slide3.JPG

Slide4.JPG

 

cropped-logo2

Advertisements
Cooking Shows

Acai Berries Are More Than a Fancy Buzzword!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! On this dreary rainy day I thought we could remember the splendor of summer by talking about acai berries!

Why acai berries? Because these last few years they have become a buzzword food that few of the clients I work with actually know why. So today I thought I would set the record straight about why people consume acai berries– other than for their delicious taste! Acai berries, powders and juices are more than just a fancy new talking point for health enthusiasts, they also have health benefits to add to your diet such as: protecting our heart, improving cognitive function and slowing down certain cancers.

download

Acai berries also contain these helpful nutrients:

  • Vitamin A
  • Fiber
  • Calcium
  • Antioxidants
  • Phytochemical- Anthocyanins

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

Now, you may be thinking, “why on earth do I care about fiber?” But worry not, I am about to explain about the different types of fiber, and why you should care.

Soluble Fiber is like the police force of the body. This type of fiber attaches itself to cholesterol particles in the body and helps them to be removed when we visit the restroom. This is very important because it helps to reduce the body’s overall cholesterol levels, which can be a contributing factor to heart disease.

Insoluble fiber can be thought of like a massive sponge in the large intestines. This type of fiber draws in water and helps regulate the movement of food through our intestines. So if you are having problems going to the restroom, then the insoluble fiber in prunes can help.

img_0235.jpg

Calcium is the essential mineral everyone was taught as a kid would help us build strong bones. And you are right in remembering that from 3rd grade science. Calcium is vital for the health of our bones, and for slowing down bone density loss as we age. The mineral calcium also impacts the muscle that surrounds blood vessels, causing it to relax. Which is important for blood pressure and muscle contraction. Just remember, it is difficult for the body to effective absorb calcium without the presence of Vitamin D in the body, so be sure to have an adequate source of Vitamin D in your diet to maximize the effects of calcium.

As you may know, acai berries contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Science is also starting to show that diets rich in antioxidants have a positive effect on cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s diseases. While these illnesses currently have no known cure, diets rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds can lower the risk of developing these diseases later in life.

acai-bowl-recipe-15-683x1024

Phytochemicals are compounds found in plants that have disease-fighting properties when ingested by humans. This is just a complicated way of saying that phytochemicals are an important part of a healthy diet to prevent certain diseases.

The phytochemical, anthocyanin, found in acai berries, has been shown to lower oxidative stress and inflammation, which can promote brain health and function. Anthocyanins are also being shown by scientific research to enhance and improve memory. Scientists think the compound works by reducing neuro-inflammation, increasing synaptic function and improving blood flow to and in the brain. But the amazing benefits of anthocyanin don’t stop here. This phytochemical has been shown by other studies to reduce the risk of heart attacks in young or middle-aged women when consumed as a part of a daily diet, and acai berries also work to decrease the levels of bad LDL cholesterol in the body. Furthermore, laboratory studies are starting to show that anthocyanins have anti-cancer properties that prevent certain cancers from spreading, they induce cancer cell death and inhibit the growth of some tumors! Thank goodness for anthocyanins!

 

RECIPES:

Slide3

Slide4

cropped-logo2

Cooking Shows

Ward Off Bad Health With Oranges

Hello and welcome to today’s installment of Cooking with Fey! With flu season sneaking up on us, I thought we should talk about the first fruit that comes to mind when we think about boosting our immune system- oranges.

Slide2.JPG

Why oranges, you say? Because oranges boost your immune system, reduce free radicals in the body, ward off some forms of heart disease and keep our skin looking youthful. That’s a lot of benefit from one little fruit!

So with all that in mind, let’s break down how oranges are able to make such wonderful boasts about helping us live a healthy lifestyle.

But before I forget, oranges are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin C
  • Fiber
  • Folate
  • Potassium
  • Thiamin
  • Antioxidants

orange-1995056__340.jpg

As you may know, oranges are a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Which is especially important now that cold weather seems to be here to stay for most parts of America.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables and foods high in Vitamin C, like oranges, had the largest positive impact.

Other studies have found that activities such as daily walking, combined with orange intake, can reduce blood pressure. So if you are concerned about your heart health talk to your doctor about adding oranges to your diet.

Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then oranges might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

If you suffer from frequent kidney stones, then try reaching for oranges to help minimize the chances of getting these uncomfortable stones in the future. The citric acid found in oranges can increase urine volume and decrease calcium levels in urine- which leads to less buildup to form kidney stones.

orange-832279__340

Fiber is necessary in our diet for improving how the digestive system functions, and fiber feeds the good bacteria that live within our digestive tract. I know, not the prettiest thing to think about, but a healthy digestive system means a healthy you. And on the bright side, a diet with healthy levels of fiber can aid in weight loss and lowering our cholesterol levels!

Folate, which is one of the B vitamins, is important for tissue growth and normal cell function. Further, folate is especially important for pregnant women and our active aging populations.

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that oranges can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively. This is important for weightlifters such as myself, as it maximizes all that hard work we put in at the gym each week.

The potassium and vitamin C in oranges also combine to protect our heart. Heart health is important for me since I live with Atrial Fibrillation. So when I read studies like the one from Vanderbilt Medical School stating that a daily intake of potassium can lower the risk of developing heart disease, I definitely made sure to start eating oranges so my own heart condition doesn’t worsen.

herhg.jpg

Another B vitamin found in oranges is Thiamin. Thiamin, also known as vitamin B1, is responsible for converting the carbohydrates we eat into energy. Which is fantastic for gym goers, as this means more energy to lift weights! The B vitamin Thiamin also helps our muscles to contract and our nervous system to send signals throughout the body.

Oranges also contain antioxidants that fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight cancer and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes.

These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

 

RECIPES:

Slide3.JPG

Slide4.JPG

cropped-logo2

Cooking Shows

Portable Nutrition with Bananas!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! Today I thought we would cover an iconic fitness fruit you commonly see in gym bags or on websites telling you to eat better- the portable banana!

Dainty bananas are a popular addition to any nutrition site or fitness regimen because of their nutritional benefits and portability. I mean, they already have a travel friendly wrapper included! But bananas are more than just the lazy person’s travel food, they also have health benefits to add to your diet such as: protecting our heart, strengthening our bones and boosting our mood. These health benefits are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation,as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

Slide2

Bananas also contain these helpful nutrients:

  • Vitamin C
  • Potassium
  • Magnesium
  • Tryptophan (an amino acid)

As you may know, bananas are a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness.

Banana-Oats-Fitness-Cookies.jpg

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health,the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables, and foods high in Vitamin C, had the largest positive impact.

Banana-Oats-Fitness-Cookies-1

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that bananas can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively. This is important for weightlifters such as myself, as it maximizes all that hard work we put in at the gym each week.

The potassium and vitamin C in bananas also combine to protect our heart. Heart health is important for me since I live with Atrial Fibrillation. So when I read studies like the one from Vanderbilt Medical School stating that a daily intake of potassium can lower the risk of developing heart disease, I definitely made sure to start eating bananas so my own heart condition doesn’t worsen.

 Magnesium works with Potassium for bone health in the body. Potassium works hard to protect us against osteoporosis and Magnesium is a powerhouse for bone formation. These two minerals combine to ensure that our bones are strong for the long run.

Vegan-Banana-Pancakes.jpg

Boost your mood with the amino acid Tryptophan! Science is showing that tryptophan may help prevent cognitive decline and boost our moods. While more research needs to be done in this area to uncover how much of an impact bananas and amino acids can have on our moods, it can’t hurt to munch on a banana the next time you are feeling grouchy!

RECIPES:

Cooking Shows

Wrinkly Prunes for Heart and Bone Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! Friday is again upon us and we are going to explore what happens to a plum when it is dehydrated and becomes a PRUNE.

Slide2

Prunes are a dried out plum, which are members of the Prunus genus and are related to other delicious foods like peaches, nectarines and oddly enough, almonds. Wrinkly prunes have health benefits to add to your diet such as: reducing free radicals in the body, keeping our red blood cells healthy and protecting our heart. These elements are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

Prunes are also an excellent source of:

  • Soluble and Insoluble Fiber
  • Iron
  • Boron
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin K
  • Potassium
  • Antioxidants

dried-apricots-1836008__340.jpg

Now, you may be thinking, “what’s with all this fancy fiber?” But worry not, I am about to explain what on earth these different types of fiber are, and why you should care.

Soluble Fiber is like the police force of the body. This type of fiber attaches itself to cholesterol particles in the body and helps them to be removed when we visit the restroom. This is very important because it helps to reduce the body’s overall cholesterol levels, which can be a contributing factor to heart disease.

Insoluble fiber can be thought of like a massive sponge in the large intestines. This type of fiber draws in water and helps regulate the movement of food through our intestines. So if you are having problems going to the restroom, then the insoluble fiber in prunes can help.

images.jpg

Prunes also contain minerals like iron. Iron is a vital part of hemoglobin, which is the stuff found in red blood cells that is responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. This means that if your body doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells, your body isn’t getting enough oxygen. A lack of oxygen in the body can make you feel fatigued, like your brain is in a “fog” or decrease your immune system.

Another mineral in prunes that you may not have heard of is boron. Boron helps activate fibroblasts of the skin after an injury to speed up the healing process. This mineral also spurs bone and tissue repair throughout the body, and dentists love boron because it helps keep our teeth and gum tissue healthy. Boron is also useful for reducing inflammation, which is great if you aren’t an avid flosser in between dental visits.

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

download

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that prunes can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively.

As you may know, prunes contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes.

These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Polyphenol antioxidants found in prunes have a fantastic impact on bone maintenance reduce the chances of developing heart diseases or diabetes. The reason for this is because polyphenols are powerful anti-inflammatories that can help those who suffer from joint inflammation or lung problems. Prunes contain over twice the polyphenol content of peaches or nectarines, so they are a great option for individuals struggling with inflammation problems.

Prunes have been found to contain adiponectin, a hormone responsible for blood pressure regulation. Researchers Parvin Mirmiran, Zahra Bahadoran and Fereidoun Azizi conducted a study on functional foods in the diet and their impact on managing type two (2) diabetes. The researchers uncovered that prunes, and other such foods, can have a positive impact for diabetics by the food’s antioxidant and bioactive compounds helping the body to manage these complicated conditions.

In addition to helping regulate blood pressure, prunes also help us protect our heart. Heart health is a serious matter, and as someone with a heart condition I can attest to how awful it is to have problems with one of our most vital organs. Prunes and their juice has been proven to lower blood pressure, overall total cholesterol levels and the bad LDL cholesterol that we all need to avoid. The fiber, potassium and antioxidants found in prunes are being shown to have positive impacts on the risk of developing heart disease later in life.

RECIPES:

Slide3.JPG

Slide4.JPG

cropped-logo2

Cooking Shows

Pretty Plums for Exceptional Health!

Slide2

Hello and welcome to today’s installment of Cooking with Fey! Since today is Friday, we are going to explore a stone fruit that goes well in recipes or eaten fresh off the tree, the PLUM.

Plums are members of the Prunus genus and are related to other delicious foods like peaches, nectarines and oddly enough, almonds. Pretty plums have health benefits to add to your diet such as: reducing free radicals in the body, regulating our blood sugar and protecting our heart. These elements are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

plums-1649316__340.jpg

Plums are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Potassium
  • Copper
  • Manganese

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

Vitamin C is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then plums might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a paper cut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that plums can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively.

Copper is a very vital mineral that every part of the body needs in order to function. Why, you might ask? Because copper helps our bodies make red blood cells, keep our nerve cells healthy and support our immune system. Copper also helps our body form collagen, absorb iron from the food we eat and assists in energy production. That sounds like a super important mineral to me!

Think of manganese as a superhero for our bones. This mineral helps bones grow and then maintain their density. Manganese, when combined with calcium, zinc and copper, supports bone mineral density in any age of human development. However, this is very important in our active ageing populations. As you may have heard, when we age our bones begin to lose their density. This can cause bones to become weak and break easily, so manganese is important to make sure we are ingesting enough of as we get older.

ooo.jpg

As you may know, plums contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Polyphenol antioxidants found in plums have a fantastic impact on bone maintenance reduce the chances of developing heart diseases or diabetes. The reason for this is because polyphenols are powerful anti-inflammatories that can help those who suffer from joint inflammation or lung problems. Plums contain over twice the polyphenol content of peaches or nectarines, so they are a great option for individuals struggling with inflammation problems.

plum

Plums have been found to contain adiponectin, a hormone responsible for blood pressure regulation. Researchers Parvin Mirmiran, Zahra Bahadoran and Fereidoun Azizi conducted a study on functional foods in the diet and their impact on managing type two (2) diabetes. The researchers uncovered that plums, and other such foods, can have a positive impact for diabetics by the food’s antioxidant and bio-active compounds helping the body to manage these complicated conditions.

In addition to helping regulate blood pressure, plums also help us protect our heart. Heart health is a serious matter, and as someone with a heart condition I can attest to how awful it is to have problems with one of our most vital organs. Plums and their juice has been proven to lower blood pressure, overall total cholesterol levels and the bad LDL cholesterol that we all need to avoid. The fiber, potassium and antioxidants found in plums are being shown to have positive impacts on the risk of developing heart disease later in life.

plum-1898196__340

RECIPES:

Slide3.JPG

Slide4.JPG

reerere.jpg

Additional Reading:

heart-1480779__340.png

cropped-logo2

Cooking Shows

Protect Yourself With Tasty Tomatoes

Hello and welcome to today’s installment of Cooking with Fey! On this breezy fall Friday we are going to exploring a fruit from the nightshade family that is commonly lumped in with vegetables, the tasty tomato.

Tomatoes are a native to South America that have health benefits to add to your diet such as: reducing free radicals in the body, battling certain cancers and assisting with the management of heart conditions or anemia.

tomatoes-1561565__340.jpg

Tomatoes are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin C
  • Potassium
  • Folate
  • Vitamin K
  • Vitamin A and Beta-Carotene
  • Antioxidants such as Lycopene and Zeaxanthin

tomatoe.jpg

Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then tomatoes might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

4694662.jpg

Meanwhile, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure and nerve function. This means that tomatoes can help the nervous system regulate muscle movements more effectively.

While folate, which is one of the B-vitamins, is important for tissue growth and normal cell function. Further, folate is especially important for pregnant women and our active aging populations.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

5419901.jpg

Vitamin A is necessary for human growth and development, cell recognition, sight, proper immune system function, sexual reproduction, as well as helping the heart, lungs, and kidneys to function normally. While Vitamin A sounds like a miracle, be careful how much you take. If you ingest too much it can be harmful to the body. Most doctors recommend that adult men consume 900 mcg per day, and women take 700 mcg per day to stay within healthy levels.

And if you’ve ever seen a red or orange fruit or vegetable, chances are that it contains Beta-carotene. This antioxidant is used by the body to create Vitamin A, which as we discussed in the previous paragraph, can help the body see better, support a healthy immune system, and protect our heart, lungs and kidneys.

5147292.jpg

As you may know, tomatoes contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes.

Lycopene is one such antioxidant that is found in cell membranes. This antioxidant helps maintain cell integrity when it is under assault by toxins or free radicals. Some scientific research has discovered that lycopene could be useful in lowering the risk of prostate cancer in men.

Zeaxanthin is an important antioxidant for our eyes. Researchers from Nutrition & Metabolism found that Zeaxanthin increases the optical density of several macular pigments, meaning it protects our eyes against the development of macular degeneration. Scientists from Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science made similar discoveries in their research of Zeaxanthin.

These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

So go ahead, grab a handful of tomatoes and enjoy the benefits this amazing food has to offer!

tomatoes-5356__340.jpg

RECIPES:

Slide3.JPG

 

Slide4.JPG

 

Additional Reading:

cropped-logo2