Cooking Shows

Cran-tastic Cranberries For Your Health!

Hello and welcome to today’s edition of Cooking with Fey! In anticipation of the Thanksgiving holiday next week I thought we could talk about an iconic fall treat, cranberries!

Cran-tastic cranberries have health benefits to add to your diet such as: helping heal UTIs, protecting our heart and warding off dental concerns. These health benefits are wonderful for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, as we can use all the help we can get to help our hearts function better and safer.

Cranberries are also an excellent source of:

  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Vitamin E
  • Manganese
  • Copper
  • Antioxidant Polyphoenols like Proanthocyandin

As you may know, cranberries are a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables and foods high in Vitamin C, like cranberries, had the largest positive impact.

Vitamin K is important to the body because it is needed for the body to product a protein called prothrombin, which allows the body to support bone metabolism and form helpful blood clots (like when you get a papercut and the blood clots to stop the bleeding, not the scary kind of blood clot). Vitamin K creates healthy, strong bones by increasing their density. Denser bones are less likely to break or sustain injury.

Think of manganese as a superhero for our bones. This mineral helps bones grow and then maintain their density. Manganese, when combined with calcium, zinc and copper, supports bone mineral density in any age of human development. However, this is very important in our active ageing populations. As you may have heard, when we age our bones begin to lose their density. This can cause bones to become weak and break easily, so manganese is important to make sure we are ingesting enough of as we get older.

Copper is a very vital mineral that every part of the body needs in order to function. Why, you might ask? Because copper helps our bodies make red blood cells, keep our nerve cells healthy and support our immune system. Copper also helps our body form collagen, absorb iron from the food we eat and assists in energy production. That sounds like a super important mineral to me!

Additionally, cranberries contain a fantastic source of antioxidants to fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from a previous blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight some cancers and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

Proanthocyandin is a type of polyphenol found in cranberries. And here’s a quick rundown on polyphenols. Polyphenols are a type of micronutrient humans can ingest by eating specific plant-based foods. These micronutrients are packed with antioxidants and health benefits. So, jumping back to proantocyandin, researchers at the Center for Oral Biology and Eastman Department of Dentistry from the University of Rochester Medical Center found that this polyphenol from cranberries was able to prevent oral bacteria from sticking to our teeth. Which is great news for dentists, as the less bacteria that attaches to our teeth the healthier they are and the less chances there are of our teeth developing dental problems down the road. Think of proanthocyandian as Teflon for our teeth. The polyphenol creates a barrier bacteria can’t stick to and cause harm to our teeth!

Proanthocyandin is also somewhat of a superhero in the circles of UTI patients. UTI stands for Urinary Tract Infection, and if you’ve ever had one of these awful infections then you know how much of a lifesaver cranberries can be. In the same way proanthocyandin prevents bacteria from sticking to our teeth, this same polyphenol prevents the UTI bacteria from attaching themselves to the urinary tract walls, which can prevent the spread of the infection and decrease the time you have one. This treatment has actually been around for hundreds of years, as Native Americans used cranberries as a treatment for bladder and kidney diseases.

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Cooking Shows

Lemons for Health and Wellness

Hello and welcome to today’s installment of Cooking with Fey! On this lovely Friday we are going to continue exploring iconic summer foods and dive into the nutrition and importance of an underutilized item in the kitchen- lemons.

Why lemons, you say? Because lemons boost your immune system, reduce free radicals in the body, ward off some cancers and heart disease and keep our skin looking youthful. That’s a lot of benefit from one little, sour fruit!

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So with all that in mind, let’s break down how lemons are able to make such wonderful boasts about helping us live a healthy lifestyle.

As you may know, lemons are a fantastic source of Vitamin C, which is an important nutrient linked to immune system health. Having a strong immune system helps the body ward off illness or recover faster from sickness. Lemons have such a high Vitamin C content that when comparing lemons to oranges the two fruits have almost equal amounts of Vitamin C, when measured gram for gram.

Vitamin C is also great for the heart. In a research study published by the Harvard School of Public Health, the diets of 126,399 adults were examined over the course of many years to reveal that for every serving of fruits and vegetables a person consumed, there was a 4% reduction in their risk of developing coronary heart disease. The study also pointed out that leafy green vegetables and foods high in Vitamin C, like lemons, had the largest positive impact.

Other studies have found that activities such as daily walking, combined with lemon intake, can reduce blood pressure. So if you are concerned about your heart health talk to your doctor about adding lemons to your diet.

Vitamin C also increases iron absorption in the body, so if you suffer from an iron deficiency or anemia, then lemons might be the answer you’ve been looking for.

Lemons also contain antioxidants that fight off free radicals in the body. As you may remember from last week’s blog on strawberries, antioxidants have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight cancer and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes.

These same antioxidants also keep our skin looking young and beautiful. Science is starting to show that consuming antioxidants can help slow the onset of wrinkles, age spots or decreased elasticity in our skin.

If you suffer from frequent kidney stones, then try reaching for lemons to help minimize the chances of getting these uncomfortable stones in the future. The citric acid found in lemons can increase urine volume and decrease calcium levels in urine- which leads to less buildup to form kidney stones.

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RECIPES:

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Additional Reading:

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Cooking Shows

America’s favorite summer food, strawberries

Hello and welcome to the official relaunch of Cooking with Fey! I hope you all saw my intro post last week that explained the concept of this series, my goals to help you with nutrition and making healthier lifestyle choices.

In today’s entry I’ll be discussing America’s favorite summer food, strawberries, and it’s nutritional value to your lifestyle. At the bottom of this post you can find recipes to start using this tasty ingredient in your kitchen.

So let’s dive right into the amazing nutritional value of incorporating strawberries into your diet.

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Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C, manganese, folate and potassium. Strawberries are also powerhouses of antioxidants that fight free radicals inside the body.

Why should you care about things potassium, folate or manganese? Well, potassium helps the body maintain a normal blood pressure, and manganese helps the body maintain its healthy bone structure, absorb calcium more efficiently and balance hormones in the body. While folate, which is one of the B-vitamins, is important for tissue growth and normal cell function. Further, folate is especially important for pregnant women and our active aging populations.

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Oh, and those antioxidants that I mentioned earlier? Not only do they fight free radicals in the body, but they also have been shown in studies to delay cognitive issues like memory less, fight cancer and decrease your chances of developing heart disease or diabetes. Now that’s a lot of awesome benefits for one little berry!

For those of us with Atrial Fibrillation, the anthocyanins found in berries (like strawberries) have been linked to improved cardiovascular health and function (2008, Favorable effects of berry consumption on platelet function, blood pressure, and HDL cholesterol).

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So what’s not to love about this spectacular little red berry? Nothing! So put on your apron and let’s get cooking!

Recipes

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Until next time!

Cheers,

Fey

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Studies on strawberries have been conducted at:

  • Harvard’s Brigham and Woman’s Hospital
  • Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • David Handley, small fruit specialist at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension
  • Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (Pharmacokinetics of anthocyanins and antioxidant effects after the consumption of anthocyanin-rich acai juice and pulp (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) in human healthy volunteers.)  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18693743

 

If you’d like to learn more about how amazing strawberries are for you, here are some articles I found helpful when researching this topic:

  • Alvarez-Suarez JM, Giampieri F, Tulipani S, et al. One-month strawberry-rich anthocyanin supplementation ameliorates cardiovascular risk, oxidative stress markers and platelet activation in humans. The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Volume 25, Issue 3, March 2014, Pages 289-294.
  • Basu A, Fu DX, Wilkinson M et al. Strawberries decrease atherosclerotic markers in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Nutr Res. 2010 Jul;30(7):462-9. 2010.
  • Basu A, Wilkinson M, Penugonda K et al. Freeze-dried strawberry powder improves lipid profile and lipid peroxidation in women with metabolic syndrome: baseline and post intervention effects. Nutr J. 2009; 8: 43. Published online 2009 September 28. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-8-43. 2009.
  • Bialasiewicz P, Prymont-Przyminska A, Zwolinska A, et al. Addition of strawberries to the usual diet decreases resting chemiluminescence of fasting blood in healthy subjects-possible health-promoting effect of these fruits consumption. J Am Coll Nutr. 2014;33(4):274-87.
  • Burton-Freeman B, Linares A, Hyson D et al. . Strawberry Modulates LDL Oxidation and Postprandial Lipemia in Response to High-Fat Meal in Overweight Hyperlipidemic Men and Women. J. Am. Coll. Nutr., Feb 2010; 29: 46 – 54. 2010.
  • Cassidy A, Rogers G, Peterson JJ, et al. Higher dietary anthocyanin and flavonol intakes are associated with anti-inflammatory effects in a population of US adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jul;102(1):172-81.
  • Ellis CL, Edirisinghe I, Kappagoda T et al. Attenuation of Meal-Induced Inflammatory and Thrombotic Responses in Overweight Men and Women After 6-Week Daily Strawberry (Fragaria) Intake: a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. J Atheroscler Thromb. 2011 Jan 13. [Epub ahead of print]. 2011.
  • Fernandes VC, Domingues VF, Mateus N et al. Organochlorine Pesticide Residues in Strawberries from Integrated Pest Management and Organic Farming. J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Jan 10. [Epub ahead of print]. 2011.
  • Gasperotti M, Masuero D, Guella G, et al. Evolution of ellagitannin content and profile during fruit ripening in Fragaria spp. J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 11;61(36):8597-607.
  • Gasperotti M, Masuero D, Mattivi F, et al. Overall dietary polyphenol intake in a bowl of strawberries: The influence of Fragaria spp. in nutritional studies. Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 18, Part B, October 2015, Pages 1057-1069.
  • Giampieri F, Alvarez-Suarez JM, Gasparrini M, et al. Strawberry consumption alleviates doxorubicin-induced toxicity by suppressing oxidative stress. Food and Chemical Toxicology, Volume 94, August 2016, Pages 128-137.
  • Giampieri F, Forbes-Hernandez TY, Gasparrini M, et al. Strawberry as a health promoter: an evidence based review. Food Funct. 2015 May;6(5):1386-98.
  • Giampieri F, Tulipani S, Alvarez-Suarez JM, et al. The strawberry: Composition, nutritional quality, and impact on human health. Nutrition, Volume 28, Issue 1, January 2012, Pages 9-19.
  • Huang Y, Park E, Edirisinghe I, et al. Maximizing the health effects of strawberry anthocyanins: understanding the influence of the consumption timing variable. Food Funct. 2016 Dec 7;7(12):4745-4752.
  • Jenkins DJA, Nguyen TH, Kendall CWC. et al. The effect of strawberries in a cholesterol-lowering dietary portfolio. Metabolism, Volume 57, Issue 12, December 2008, Pages 1636-1644.
  • Negri AS, Allegra D, Simoni L, et al. Comparative analysis of fruit aroma patterns in the domesticated wild strawberries “Profumata di Tortona” (F. moschata) and “Regina delle Valli” (F. vesca). Frontiers in Plant Science. 2015;6:56. doi:10.3389/fpls.2015.00056.
  • Pinto Mda S, de Carvalho JE, Lajolo FM, et al. Evaluation of antiproliferative, anti-type 2 diabetes, and antihypertension potentials of ellagitannins from strawberries (Fragaria — ananassa Duch.) using in vitro models. J Med Food. 2010 Oct;13(5):1027-35. 2010.
  • Prymont-Przyminska A, Bialasiewicz P, Zwolinska A, et al. Addition of strawberries to the usual diet increases postprandial but not fasting non-urate plasma antioxidant activity in healthy subjects. Clin Biochem Nutr. 2016 Nov;59(3):191-198.
  • Reber JD, Eggett DL and Parker TL. Antioxidant capacity interactions and a chemical/structural model of phenolic compounds found in strawberries. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2011 Mar 8. [Epub ahead of print]. 2011.
  • Rengarajanm T and Yaacob NS. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways. European Journal of Pharmacology, Volume 789, 15 October 2016, Pages 8-16.
  • Sandulachi E, Tatarov P, and Croitor D. The Estimation of Dependency of Fresh Berries Physico-Chemical Properties on Storage and Processing Conditions. Annals : Food Science and Technology Year: 2010 Vol: 11 Issue: 1 Pages/record No.: 13-15. 2010.
  • Shukitt-Hale B, Bielinski DF, Lau FC, et al. The beneficial effects of berries on cognition, motor behaviour and neuronal function in ageing. Br J Nutr. 2015 Nov 28;114(10):1542-9.
  • Tomas-Barberan FA, Garcia-Villalba R, Gonzalez-Sarrias A, et al. Ellagic acid metabolism by human gut microbiota: consistent observation of three urolithin phenotypes in intervention trials, independent of food source, age, and health status. J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Jul 16;62(28):6535-8.
  • Tulipani S, Armeni T, Giampieri F, et al. Strawberry intake increases blood fluid, erythrocyte and mononuclear cell defenses against oxidative challenge. Food Chemistry, Volume 156, 1 August 2014, Pages 87-93.
  • Zasowska-Nowak A, Nowak PJ, Bialasiewicz P, et al. Strawberries Added to the Usual Diet Suppress Fasting Plasma Paraoxonase Activity and Have a Weak Transient Decreasing Effect on Cholesterol Levels in Healthy Nonobese Subjects. Am Coll Nutr. 2016 Jul;35(5):422-35.

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Cooking Shows

Cooking with Fey Series Announcement and Life Update!

Hello and welcome everyone to today’s episode of Cooking with Fey. You may notice that we aren’t in my kitchen for today’s video, and that is because I have a channel announcement for you all.

As you may know, I have a day job and work as a personal trainer at night. Well, I’ve been getting a lot more personal training clients recently and I had to make a very difficult choice, to take on more clients on the weekends or keep filming my cooking videos. So after a lot of thinking and pondering, I’ve decided to put the Cooking with Fey series on hold for a while. I don’t plan on cancelling the series forever, but for the next few months I want to really focus on my second job and gaining more clients.

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The end goal to all of this is to become successful enough with my personal training job that I can quit my day job and stop working seven (7) days a week. At that time I plan on starting up the Cooking with Fey series again. My current plan is to quit my day job and move into personal training full time by the spring of 2018, but depending on how many new clients I am working with might push that timeline forward. Let’s keep our fingers crossed that business continues to grow and I can resume the series sooner rather than later.

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I really appreciate your patience and flexibility with me while I work towards this goal, and work up the courage to quite my day job. It’s a big step for me and one that has a lot of anxiety and uncertainty for me and my husband. So please bear with me while I work through this leap of faith.

As always, please like and subscribe to this channel to stay up to date on new content, and head on over to Instagram (@fey_fitness) to give me a follow or to YouTube at Fey Fitness.

My Patreon page is now live, so please go show some love there as well. I’d like to make some upgrades to my videos to enhance your viewing pleasure, and any support would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers,

Fey

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FeyFitness

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fey_fitness

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FeyFitness

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Cooking Shows

Atrial Fibrillation Approved Grocery Haul for December 3rd, 2017!

Hello and welcome everyone to another episode of Cooking with Fey!

Today I thought I would share with you a grocery haul that is perfect for those of us with Atrial Fibrillation. When shopping for groceries with Atrial Fibrillation, try to stick with fresh fruits and vegetables and unprocessed meats. The goal is to eat food in as close to it’s nature state as possible, so try to avoid foods found in boxes or cans.

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You’ll also want to try and limit your salt or sugar intake. I’m trying out some Greek yogurt mixed with fruit to add more protein to my diet, and ward off those pesky sugar cravings. Salt is another thing to avoid. By reducing your intake of boxed or canned food items you can decrease your salt intake fairly easily and naturally. When cooking, try to cut back on how much salt you would normally use and see how your meal tastes. You might be surprised by how easy it is to reduce your salt content in food without sacrificing flavor.

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Leafy greens are a must, as they are a great source of micro-nutrients your body needs. Broccoli is an amazing addition to your diet for the vitamin content as well, so try roasting or steaming this yummy food to add to your lunches or dinners throughout the week.

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Meat, like chicken, is a great source of protein to help your body repair and maintain muscle tissue, like your heart. So be sure to get between 40-60 grams of protein each day to help your body performing at its best.

If you have any specific questions please leave them in the comments down below and I would be happy to answer them.

As always, please like and subscribe to this channel to stay up to date on new content, and head on over to Instagram (@fey_fitness) to give me a follow or to YouTube at Fey Fitness.

My Patreon page is now live, so please go show some love there as well. I’d like to make some upgrades to my videos to enhance your viewing pleasure, and any support would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers,

Fey

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FeyFitness

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fey_fitness

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FeyFitness

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Cooking Shows

Vegan Rice Pudding with Only Four (4) Ingredients

Hello and welcome everyone to another edition of Cooking with Fey!

Today I wanted to show you all how to add a healthy twist to one of my favorite comfort foods- rice pudding. This version is vegan friendly and uses only four ingredients, so it is ridiculously quick and easy to make.

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For this recipe you will need:

  • 1 & 1/2 cups of coconut milk
  • 1 & 1/2 cups of leftover cooked rice
  • 1 Tbsp. of cinnamon
  • 1 Tbsp. of honey (agave or maple syrup can be used instead)

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Some optional ingredients are:

  • 1 tsp. of vanilla
  • 1-2 star anise pods
  • 2-3 Tbsp. of coconut flakes

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To make this recipe:

  1. Place all ingredients in a pot and bring to a simmer.
  2. Simmer for 5-10 minutes.
  3. Cover and let sit for 5 minutes.
  4. Enjoy!

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This recipe is really that easy to make. Homemade rice pudding can be a great alternative to sweet treats such as Nutty Bars, ice cream, or candy. Depending on how you make it, rice pudding has less calories and fat than dairy-based sweet treats, and rice pudding contains around 4 grams of protein per 1/2 cup serving. Beat that Nutty Bars!

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As always, please like and subscribe to this channel to stay up to date on new content, and head on over to Instagram (@fey_fitness) to give me a follow or to YouTube at Fey Fitness.

My Patreon page is now live, so please go show some love there as well. I’d like to make some upgrades to my videos to enhance your viewing pleasure, and any support would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers,

Fey

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FeyFitness

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fey_fitness

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FeyFitness

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Cooking Shows

Cooking Basics 101: Gluten Free and Organic Tricolor Quinoa!

Hello and welcome everyone to another episode of Cooking with Fey! Today I will show you how to make some delicious tricolor quinoa. Quinoa is gluten free and full of delicious vitamins and minerals, so it is a perfect addition to any diet.

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For this recipe you will need:

  • 1 cup of organic quinoa
  • 2 cups of filtered water

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Simply place these ingredients into a cooking pot and bring to a boil. Once it reaches a boil, reduce the heat and let it simmer for 10-15 minutes.

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And you’re done! It’s that easy to make.

Be sure to check out my Instagram account @fey_fitness for a sneak peak into my daily life, or my YouTube channel at Fey Fitness for fun cooking and fitness videos! My Patreon page is now live, so please go show some love there as well. I’d like to make some upgrades to my videos to enhance your viewing pleasure, so any support would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers,

Fey

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